October 31, 2011

word

cognoscenti [kon-yuhshen-tee, kog-nuh-] n. persons who have superior knowledge and understanding of a particular field, especially in the fine arts, literature, and world of fashion

birthday

John Keats (1795), Dan Rather (1931), Michael Landon (1936), David Ogden Stiers (1942), Peter Frampton (1943), Sally Kirkland (1944), Brian Doyle-Murray (1945), John Candy (1950), Peter Jackson (1961), Johnny Marr (1963), Dermot Mulroney (1963), Rob Schneider (1963), Adam Horovitz (1966), Vanilla Ice (1967)

standpoint
Over the weekend, the Philadelphia area got an early snowstorm and the alarmists were out in full force. One local newswoman warned people whose bed was near a window next to a tree to sleep in another room for fear wind might blow icy branches through the glass panes and be “potentially fatal.” She was being completely serious. 

Hurricane Schwartz and anyone else who claim to predict the weather should be taken as seriously as any FoxNews anchor.

Is it going to be sunny? Is it going to rain? Is it going to snow? What’s the weather guy/girl say? We all ask these questions constantly even though most of us understand forecasting the weather is next to impossible. And that’s due to the simple fact that forecasting the weather is actually impossible.

No one knows what’s going to happen. Yes, I’ll admit they’ve got a slightly better idea about tomorrow’s weather but only slightly. But Hurricane and his cronies aren’t offering their opinions; they’re posing as weather authorities.

It’s fucking genius if you think about it. Without the weather, local news programming is diminished to a tally of all the awful shit that happened during the course of the day, and the rehashing of sporting events that most everyone watched all ready. Without the weather, local news programming has no hold over us. Without that control, hardly anyone would watch. And so, it drums up scary situations in which Mother Nature will make mincemeat out of those of us who neglected to buy a few weeks’ worth of milk and bread hours before every time snowflakes fall from the sky.

For reasons I can’t explain, we still listen to it. And, sadly, we probably always will.

quotation

There are nights when the wolves are silent and only the moon howls. ↔ George Carlin

tune

Sometimes I add a song to my iPod and then completely forget about it. A few months later I’ll be driving along listening on shuffle and the song will make a reappearance. And I realize that, for whatever reason, I wasn’t ready to appreciate the song until that moment in time. Such was the way with “Changing” by The Airborne Toxic Event.

gallimaufry

→ Hopefully, this dude will stop talking shit for a while. The Philadelphia Eagles completely embarrassed Rob Ryan and the Dallas Cowboys last night. Guess Andy Reid gets to keep his job for a little longer.

→ This is crazy. 7 BILLION PEOPLE. It’s kinda perplexing.

→ In case you’re wondering what the next frivolous thing we’re all supposed to be worrying about might be, look no further: Sonic Drugs.

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04.22.10 – A Thursday

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word

vainglory [veyn-glawr-ee, -glohr-ee, veyn-glawr-ee,-glohr-ee] n. 1. excessive elation or pride over one’s own achievements, abilities, etc.; boastful vanity 2. empty pomp or show

birthday

Immanuel Kant (1724), Vladimir Lenin (1870), Vernon Johns (1892), J. Robert Oppenheimer (1904), Charles Mingus (1922), Bettie Page (1923), Aaron Spelling (1923), Charlotte Rae (1926), Glen Campbell (1936), Jack Nicholson (1937), John Waters (1946), Peter Frampton (1950), Paul Carrack (1951), Marilyn Chambers (1952), Ryan Stiles (1959), Jeffrey Dean Morgan (1966), Daniel Johns (1979)

standpoint

You’ve probably noticed there were no new posts the past two days. I’ve been deliberating about this blog, trying to figure out where to go with it.

A little over a year ago, I started the euneJeune daily for a few reasons, none of which are still relevant. But, along the way, this blog took on a life of its own.

I’ve taken a few hiatuses and even once or twice declared it over.

But, after thinking about it long and hard, I’m sad to declare this blog will end next Friday, April 30th.

Starting tomorrow, there will be only six more posts. I’ll concentrate my efforts on relaying the important things I’ve learned in the past year, after 230 posts and almost 30,000 hits.

I hope those of you who have loyally visited here everyday will appreciate the last several entries. Again, thanks for reading. Come back tomorrow for some more.

quotation

Time is a great teacher, but unfortunately it kills all its pupils… Louis Hector Berlioz

tune

Not much else to say about Bob Schneider but that, lyrically, he’s pretty fucking awesome. Take a listen to “Metal and Steel.”

gallimaufry

→ Despite my erroneous prediction, the Philadelphia Flyers are up 3 games to 1 on the New Jersey Devils. I’m headed over to my best friend Harv’s place tonight to watch what I hope is the series clincher between the two teams. Just learned the Flyers job is going to be a bit harder since they’re lost forwards Simon Gagne and Jeff Carter. Let’s hope this isn’t a replay of 2000.

Who brought this shit to Philadelphia? I’m dismayed.

→ How many of you think, after reading this, Trey Parker and Matt Stone will go into hiding?

04.22.09 – Wednesday

Today is Earth Day!

Word: espouse [i-spouz, i-spous] v. 1. to make one’s own; adopt or embrace, as a cause 2. to marry 3. to give (a woman) in marriage

Birthday: Immanuel Kant (1724), Vladimir Lenin (1870), Vladimir Nabokov (1899), Robert Oppenheimer (1904), Charles Mingus (1922), Aaron Spelling (1923), Charlotte Rae (1926), Richard Donner (1930), Glen Campbell (1936), Jack Nicholson (1937), John Waters (1946), Peter Frampton (1950), Paul Carrack (1951), Marilyn Chambers (1952), Ryan Stiles (1959), Byron Allen (1961), Jeffrey Dean Morgan (1966), Daniel Johns (1979)

Ocurrence: 1970 – The first ever Earth Day is held.

Standpoint: Twitter. You can’t escape it. It’s everywhere. In the past month, I haven’t read a newspaper or watched a talk show where there hasn’t there wasn’t some reference to Twitter, “tweets,” “twittering,” “tweeting” or one of the myriad of other new terms that has invaded the English language because of the overwhelming popularity of the social networking site. If you haven’t heard of it, you must be purposely trying to avoid it. Twitter (and everything to do with it) is currently big news. Last week, Ashton Kutcher challenged CNN to a race to see which one could get to 1 million followers first. Kutcher won. Also last week, Oprah Winfrey publicly joined Twitter on her show where her guest was Evan Williams, Twitter’s CEO. Her first tweet was unsuccessful. Some guy named Corey Menscher has invented the Kickbee, a device a pregnant woman can wear that will detect her baby “kicking” and post a tweet about it.

I joined Twitter a little over a month ago. I railed against it for a while, but finally succumbed. Really just to figure out what the hell it was all about. So, what have I learned? In essence, Twitter is primarily an outlet for people to braindump. Some denominate it microblogging. I think it of it as more full-dress insanity. The tweets come fast and furious. I’m not particular about who I follow or who I allow to follow me. I employ Twitter to drum up additional traffic for this blog, so I figure, the more the merrier.

But individuals are on Twitter for all kinds of reasons. As I’m writing this, I’ve just passed 400 followers. In addition, I’m following close to 800 people in the Twitterverse. I know all of 12 of them personally. The rest are celebrities (Kutcher, P. Diddy and ,yes, even Wil Wheaton), news sites (CNN, E! Online, The Huffington Post), musical acts (Someone Still Loves You Boris Yeltsin, Band of Horses), companies trying to sell stuff (which is seemingly effective) or fellow bloggers.

Some that I’m following (or they’re following me, it becomes increasingly difficult to keep it all in order), are simply odd. One guy I was following was actually posing as Christopher Walken. His tweets were pretty funny and I could picture the actor writing them. The guy was caught and booted. (He’s now back.)Another person contantly updates conditions on the highways in and around San Jose, CA. I’ve no use for this information but I don’t drop anyone so I’m continually informed on what roads not to take around a city I’ve no current plans to step foot in. These are just two examples. There are hundreds, probably more like hundreds of thousands, more.

So, is Twitter useful? I’d love to give some snarky response about how it’s not, but that would be dishonest. My blog traffic has increased because of my Twitter activity. Not because my clever tweets are necessarily reeling everyone in but because of the promiscuous following habits of most users, myself included. I’m pretty certain that hardly anyone is reading even 10% of all the tweets that appear on their Twitter homepage. So, while it’s doubtful that everyone in TwitterLand is paying real attention to one another, it doesn’t really seem to matter. It’s more about being involved in swirling mayhem and telling people, “Yeah, I’m on Twitter.” 

Quotation: Thank God man cannot fly, and lay waste the sky as well as the earth. Henry David Thoreau

Tune: Sadly, I didn’t get into Guided By Voices until last summer. After listening to Robert Pollard and crew’s many great songs, I quietly wondered what planet I’d been living on that I never ran across them before. Listen to “Echos Myron.”

Gallimaufry: After being hospitalized a few days ago, it appears that physicist Stephen Hawking will make a full recovery…President Obama sure has had his fair share of firsts. Here’s another one. He’ll be the first US President to appear topless on the cover of a magazineFacebook groups are popping against, of all people, martial artist and movie star Jackie Chan for comments he made over the weekend, including that “the Chinese need to be controlled.” Apparently, the guy’s a fan of oppression. Who knew?

Incoming: TomorrowAnnoying Sayings & Misused Words. Friday3 Things To Do in Philly When You’re Dead and more.