04.15.11 – a friday

word

mythomania [mith-uhmey-nee-uh] n. lying or exaggerating to an abnormal degree

birthday

Leonardo da Vinci (1452), Kenneth Lay (1942), Emma Thompson (1959), Seth Rogen (1982), Emma Watson (1990)

standpoint

Here’s a few things that are on bugging the crap out of me right now.

→ The Philadelphia Flyers lost to the Buffalo Sabres last night in the first game of their best-of-seven series. I’m unhappy about that but still hopeful the Flyers will pull this one out and advance to the next round. For to happen, two things will be needed: First, Chris Pronger needs to get back in the lineup. Second, Claude Giroux needs to stop attempting to complete the perfect pass and shoot, shoot, shoot and shoot some more.

Charlie Sheen, you’ve gone from wildly entertaining to mildly amusing to sadly uninteresting in a few short weeks. Take a vacation. Come back and see us in a month or so, maybe a year. We’ll call you when we’re ready to talk.

→ One of my favorite sitcoms ever is NewsRadio. It was way ahead of its time and probably would’ve lasted years longer were it not for the tragic death of Phil Hartman. ReelzChannel is now playing reruns several times a day. It’s the little things, people.

That’s all I have for today. Thanks for reading.

quotation

The great majority of men are bundles of beginnings. ↔ Ralph Waldo Emerson

tune

A few weekends ago, I was browsing around Main Street Music in Manayunk and the lady behind the counter, who couldn’t have been more helpful, recommended I check out Panoptic Mirror Maze, a new release by Brown Recluse. I was ready to buy it but then she discovered she’d sold all the copies in the store. But I came home and checked the Philadelphia band out online and I definitely like what I hear. Here’s “Notorious.” (Brown Recluse will be playing at Main Street Music this Saturday for Record Store Day 2011.)

gallimaufry

Sometimes the comments morons make on an online news story are actually more interesting than the story itself.

Reading this article filled me with the desire to book a flight to absolutely nowhere. Maybe too much information.

Barry Bonds, you completely suck. Seriously. 

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03.16.10 – A Tuesday

Add to DeliciousAdd to DiggAdd to FaceBookAdd to Google BookmarkAdd to MySpaceAdd to NewsvineAdd to RedditAdd to StumbleUponAdd to TechnoratiAdd to Twitter

word

obstreperous [uhb-strep-er-uhs] adj. 1. resisting control or restraint in a difficult manner; unruly 2. noisy, clamorous, or boisterous: obstreperous children

birthday

James Madison (1751), John Butler Yeats (1839), Marlin Perkins (1905), Henny Youngman (1906), Pat Nixon (1912), Jerry Lewis (1926), Daniel Patrick Moynihan (1927), Tommy Flanagan (1930), Chuck Woolery (1941), Erik Estrada (1949), Elliott Murphy (1949), Nancy Wilson (1954), Flavor Flav (1959), Todd McFarlane (1961), Patty Griffin (1964), Lauren Graham (1967), Riley Cote (1982), Wolfgang Van Halen (1991)

standpoint

Lately, I’ve stopped going out so much and have been watching more television than I’m comfortable admitting. By nature, I’m a thinker and so, while I sit and watch, I also ponder why I watch what I watch.

I’ve discovered one reason is I’m drawn to certain characters in certain shows and not always for the same reason. In most cases, I gravitate toward the supporting characters more than the leads.

So, of course I’ve compiled a list – Top Five Supporting Male TV Characters. Here is each one with a personifying video clip.

Peter MacNicol as Dr. Larry Fleinhardt on Numb3rs.

Quirky, goofball zen genius who begrudgingly participates in solving every crime imaginable with advanced math theory.

John Larroquette as Asst. DA Dan Fielding on Night Court.

Television no longer tolerates sexist characters as irredeemable as Dan Fielding.

Richard Schiff as Toby Ziegler on The West Wing.

Perpetually cranky White House Communications Director who often broke the rules to do the right thing.

Phil Hartman as Bill McNeal on NewsRadio.

Perhaps one of the most brilliant characters ever.

Michael K. Williams as Omar Little on The Wire.

Possibly the biggest badass in television history.

quotation

There is a chalk outline being drawn around common sense, and most people cannot even identify the victim. ↔ Dennis Miller

tune

A few weeks back I changed the Tune section here. Instead of linking to a video, I’m now embedding it in the actual post. The decision was made mainly due to the fact I’m now, for reasons I still don’t comprehend, able to view YouTube videos on my ancient laptop. With the onset of my embedding capabilities, I’m taking the liberty of re-posting some songs I’ve featured in the past. So, without further ado, here is the video from “Worry About It Later” by brakesbrakesbrakes. It’s one of my top five from this past year.

gallimaufry

Man, cocaine users can’t catch a friggin’ break. All ready no friend of law enforcement, now they’ve got the environmentalist on their asses. Poor bastards.

This woman is doing a bang-up job in contributing to the bad reputation of New Jersey. At the end of the article we learn people actually pay to watch her eat. I’d pay a small fortune to have never been exposed to her pathetic story.

→ This past weekend, most of us here in the United States lost an hour of sleep on Saturday night because of some bullshit called Daylight Saving Time, a process where all the clocks get turned an hour ahead. There are times when I wish Benjamin Franklin would’ve kept some of his brilliant fucking ideas to himself.

09.18.09 – A Friday

Word

querolous [kweruh-luhs, kwer-yuh-] adj. 1. full of complaints; complaining 2. characterized by or uttered in complaint; peevish: a querulous tone; constant querulous reminders of things to be done

Birthday

Trajan (53), Samuel Johnson (1709), George Read (1733), Greta Garbo (1905), Jack Warden (1920), Robert Blake (1933), Frankie Avalon (1939), Fred Willard (1939), Dee Dee Ramone (1952), James Gandolfini (1961), Holly Robinson Peete (1964), Lance Armstrong (1971), Jada Pinkett Smith (1971), James Marsden (1973), Xzibit (1974), Jason Sudeikis (1975)

Standpoint

If you’re an avid reader of this blog, and it’s shame if you’re not, you’ve come to the conclusion that I’m an above-average humorous individual. To put it mildly.

And, after reaching  that conclusion, I’m betting you’ve wondered, “Hey. How’d that guy get so goddamn funny? What his secret?” Well, it stems from all kinds of places. I will say that, coming from a family with five other siblings competing for attention at the dinner table, it didn’t take a genius to figure out the the proper execution of well-timed humor earned you a little more time at the podium during the nightly palaver.

But that wasn’t all there was to it. I had my influences. At a young age, I decided every single person in the entertainment business was essentially just borrowing material from somewhere or another, and presenting it as their own original ponderings. But, once in a while, I’d see something that either (a) was borrowing shit from so many different places it did actually became original content, or (b) was original content. Watching anything that fell into one of those categories represented a possibility of, for me at least, a tiny shred of hope the world wasn’t doomed to watch garbage like “Charles In Charge” or “Who’s The Boss?” for the rest of eternity.  

Here are a few things you can watch if you want to see exactly what I’m talking about. (Note: It’s a coincidence that Dave Foley is in two of the three clips here. Or maybe not. He’s a funny motherfucker.) (Another note: I was going to embed the videos but I couldn’t with some so just hit the link.)

Clip OneNewsRadio“The Cane”

Phil Hartman has my vote as the funniest person ever to put two feet on Earth’s soil. This scene from “NewsRadio” with Dave Foley represents most of the range Hartman possessed. Foley is great, too.

 Clip(s) TwoKids In The Hall“King of Empty Promises” and The State“Porcupine Racetrack”

“Kids In The Hall” is debatably the funniest sketch comedy show of all-time. Other might say it was “The State.” I lean towards the latter, but, really it all depends on my mood. Both were unendingly funny. Both went places similar shows (“SNL“MADtv”) either weren’t allowed to go or were incapable of. These two sketches helped convinced me there were other like-minded lunatics out there in the world.

Clip ThreeBlack Books“Bernard Black Drunk”

This clip from “Black Books” – the British sitcom that aired on the UK’s Channel 4 for three seasons and the US’ Comedy Central for about one hour late some random Sunday night – is representative of the completely hilarious work Dylan Moran and Bill Bailey did on this unfortunately still-unknown classic.

 Sadly, if you don’t find any/all of this funny, there’s only one thing wrong with you. You would fail to recognize humor if it walked up and kneecapped you.

Quotation

A drunk driver’s very dangerous. Everybody knows that. But so is a drunken backseat driver – if he’s persuasive. ← Demetri Martin

Tune

Yesterday, I revealed that I’m a sucker for a song with well-written lyrics. Well, there’s something that can make a song with well-written lyrics even better. And that’s a multi-part harmony. When done the right way, multiple harmonies can turn an ordinary song into an anthem. The multiple harmony song usually starts off kind of slow, but that’s not a requirement. There is one steadfast rule, though, each harmony, and its corresponding lyrics, has to be introduced separately. A byproduct of that is the song can travel all over the rythmic spectrum, producing the effect of several songs contained in one. The result of the crescendo is an overlapping vocal harmony where all the separate vocal sections are woven into each other and the best parts of each accompanying melody are grooved into one. The final minute of such a song should make you want to turn up the volume, roll down the windows and hit the gas pedal. That’s how you know it’s a good one. I have five favorite songs falling into that category. But, I think I’ve decided that “See These Bones” by Nada Surf is the greatest. The best part is when Matthew Caws comes in with “The lights in the city are more or less blinking/Which side of the story decides what you’re thinking.” It’s the beginning of the end. But in a really good way. Listen to it. I’m not wrong. Right?

Gallimaufry

→ Man, am I glad I never got around to removing the PEOPLE SUCK sticker from the interior of my car. Because, I’m really sorry, it’s one of the indisputable truths of this world. Need more proof than the cool sticker in my car? Check out WhyTheFuckDoYouHaveAKid.com. As Jonathan Schmock, the actor who played the Chez Quiz Maitre D’ in Ferris Bueller’s Day Off (click that link to watch the original movie trailer.), stated so very snootily, “I weep for the future.”

→ You know what’s a really great thing? When the mayor of one of the largest cities in the country plays chicken with the state legislature using innocent peoples’ jobs as a bargaining chip. That’s what Philadelphia’s mayor, Michael Nutter, did with the jobs of 3,000 municipal workers in an attempt to pry money out of Pennsylvania. It worked. But still. Kind of shitty.

→ All right. Need to make a teensy tiny request of the fashion world here. Please make the fucking Snuggie go away. I’ll help in whatever way I can. Just let me know where to be and when to ber there. For centuries, individuals have made an easy time of having a blanket on top of them as they relax. It’s kind of like Basic Human Knowledge 101.  We don’t need one that slips over our heads. We are not Old West Mexican gunfighters.