November 23, 2011

word

bibliophage [bib-lee-uh-feyj] n. an ardent reader; a bookworm

birthday

William H. “Billy the Kid” Bonney (1859) (most likely inaccurate), Boris Karloff (1887), Harpo Marx (1888), Bruce Hornsby (1954), Chris Hardwick (1971), Miley Cyrus (1992)

standpoint

I’ve watched a lot of movies. And when it comes to movies there’s about a million lists out there of the best this and the worst that and what have you. But one list that’s mostly overlooked is The Biggest Assholes in Movie History. Sure there are a few out there but it’s largely an explored area. So I thought I would weigh in on this topic that is obviously in dire need of address. So here’s my list…so far.

Justin Timberlake as Sean Parker in The Social Network – Usually, Timberlake does his best to look squeaky clean in his cinematic endeavors but I gotta respect the guy for taking this role and doing a great job with it.

Hart Bochner as Harry Ellis in Die Hard – Ok, I know he’s more comic relief than serious asshole but the guy exemplifies every douchebag in the 80s. (Side note: I had no Bochner directed PCU until I had to look him up for this post.)

Matt Damon as Charlie Dillon in School Ties – If you can watch this movie and not want to punch real-life Matt Damon in the face, you’ve got ice water running through your veins.

Gene Hackman as John Herod in The Quick and The Dead – This clip doesn’t really reveal the extent of what a gigantic shithead Hackman plays in this movie but it’s the best scene so I thought I would include it.

William Atherton as Walter Peck in Ghostbusters – Atherton might be a very nice guy in real life but he will always be known for being one of the biggest assholes to ever grace the screen. I could’ve also cited him for Die Hard or Real Genius.

So that’s that. Feel free to comment if you think there are any I’ve overlooked.

quotation

I celebrated Thanksgiving in an old-fashioned way. I invited everyone in my neighborhood to my house, we had an enormous feast, and then I killed them and took their land. ↔ Jon Stewart

tune

Here’s the thing about The Muppets: They’re fucking awesome. Even though, they’re not technically members of the human race, they sum up everything great about it. They always assume the best about whatever situation they find themselves in. But they’re also incredibly sarcastic and, at times, they do actually get angry. But, in the end, they always forgive. I love this clip of Jason Segel’s SNL monologue from this past Saturday. (Sorry, you’re going to have to clip on the link. It wouldn’t embed properly.)

gallimaufry

→ Last night, CNN aired the GOP National Security Debate. I listened to most of it as I was preparing this post. When is the GOP going to realize it is doing itself absolutely no service by holding all of these debates? It’s become comical. My favorite part was when Herman Cain addressed Wolf Blitzer as “Blitz.” Here’s an article on some of the other gaffes from last night’s hi-jinks.

→ I know I’m probably beating this to death but what else is new? Yesterday, on 97.5 The Fanatic, Mike Missanelli interviewed Eric Lindros and John LeClair. During the interview, they discussed their latest charity efforts with CHOP (Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia), what it was like to play with each other, Lindros’ feelings about his return to the city that shunned him and lots of other stuff.

→ I won’t be posting again until sometime next week. Happy Thanksgiving!

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07.28.09 – Tuesday

Word: vicissitude [vi-sis-i-tood, -tyood] n. 1. a change or variation occurring in the course of something 2. interchange or alternation, as of states or things 3. vicissitudes, successive, alternating, or changing phases or conditions, as of life or fortune; ups and downs: They remained friends through the vicissitudes of 40 years 4. regular change or succession of one state or thing to another 5. change; mutation; mutability

Birthday: Ignaz Bösendorfer (1796), Ballington Booth (1857), Grand Duchess Anastasia Mikhailovna of Russia (1860), Beatrix Potter (1866), Marcel Duchamp (1887), Barbara La Marr (1896), Rudy Vallee (1901), Charles Townes (1915), Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis (1929), Junior Kimbrough (1930), Mike Bloomfield (1943), Bill Bradley (1943), Richard Wright (1943), Jim Davis (1945), Gerald Casale (1948), Sally Struthers (1948), Michael Hitchcock (1958), Lori Loughlin (1964), Stephen Lynch (1971), Elizabeth Berkley (1972), Soulja Boy Tell ‘Em (1990)

Quotation: People have to talk about something just to keep their voice boxes in working order so they’ll have good voice boxes in case there’s ever anything really meaningful to say. Kurt Vonnegut Jr.

Tune: The other day, I went through the list of music artists I’ve featured here and was pretty damn stupefied I’d never included anything by Pete Yorn. For the last several years, I always find myself coming back to his albums because, in some ways, they’re pretty close to perfect. At least most of the songs definitely are. Check out “Crystal Village” – off his second album, Day I Forgot. Also, he celebrated his 35th birthday yesterday. (Which you already knew because you read this blog everyday.)

Gallimaufry: If I went by Bob Poilon of NPR.org, and his list of the Best Albums of 2009 (So Far), I’d have to seriously consider that maybe I’m not as hip as I think I am, seeing as how I only own 4 out of 30. Wow. I gotta get on the stick and start listening to some more music. I mean, the year is halfway over already. Check it out and see how many of the albums you’ve got – you might just be as surprised as I was. Do you love Young Guns, and/or more importantly Young Guns II? Well, then I’m about to tell you about the best vacation idea you’ve possibly ever heard of in your life. The New Mexico Tourism Department has created a six-day intinerary designed to help you follow in the footsteps of the legendary Billy the Kid, including something called “The Billy the Kid Pageant.” There seems to be no mention of the fact William H. Bonney‘s (as The Kid was formally known) story is one that most scholars agree is mostly fiction. Likewise, it’s not known if vacationing Wild West enthusiasts will be participating in something Billy the Kid definitely did do, namely wandering around the desert for long stretches of time, starving and exhausted. In what can only be considered the boldest of bold moves, EW.com is challenging the longheld notion that 1939 was the best year for the release of films by offering instead…the year 1984. And it may just have a very valid, solidly based point on its hands. Some of the films that debuted 25 years ago? Footloose. Splash. Romancing The Stone. This Is Spinal Tap. The Natural. Sixteen Candles. The Karate Kid. Ghostbusters. Revenge of the Nerds. RED DAWN. The Terminator. Beverly Hills Cop. Johnny Dangerously. And so many more. Hard to believe all those movies were all released (a) in the same year and (b) a quarter century ago.

06.02.09 – Tuesday

Word: ephemeral [i-fem-er-uhl] adj. 1. lasting a very short time; short-lived; transitory: the ephemeral joys of childhood 2. lasting but one day: an ephemeral flower  ∞ n. 3. anything short-lived, as certain insects

Birthday: Martha Washington (1731), Marquis de Sade (1740), Thomas Hardy (1840), Johnny Weissmuller (1904), Sally Kellerman (1937), Stacy Keach (1941), Charlie Watts (1941), Jerry Mathers (1948), Gary Bettman (1952), Dana Carvey (1955), Lydia Lunch (1959), Kyle Petty (1960), B-Real (1970), Wayne Brady (1972), Nikki Cox (1978), Justin Long (1978)

Quotation: In a minute there is time for decisions and revisions which a minute will reverse. T.S. Eliot

Tune: Lately, I’ve been exploring my iPod and finding songs I’m not sure ended up on it. Some are terrible. Others are quite good. Here’s “Innocent Violent Ordinary” by The Appleseed Cast. It’s one of the good ones.

Gallimaufry: If you play the lottery on any kind of regular basis, this will drive you nuts. More proof there is really no justice out there. I wonder what the inept individuals ended up doing with all the money. ∞ Ghostbusters was one of the most successful movies of all-time. A classic. Irrefutably so. Ghostbusters II was a classic sequel. Kind of shitty, but you watch when there’s nothing else on. Now years later, when everyone is remaking everything, the original creators of Ghostbusters decided to try something a little different. (Although it does seem there might be some interest in making a third movie.) Enter Ghostbusters: The Video Game. Bill Murray (Peter Venkman), Dan Aykroyd (Ray Stantz), Harold Ramis (Egon Spengler) and Ernie Hudson (Winston Zeddmore) all contributed their voices to the game, set to come out June 16th for XBox 360, Playstation 3, Wii and Nintendo DS. Also involved were original cast members Annie Potts, Brian Doyle Murray and William Atherton. The game looks to be pretty sweet and has been met with some solid reviews. If you’re wondering, yes, I’ll be getting it. ∞ Hey, remember when Weezer used to be cool? Yeah, I don’t either. But now there’s a Weezer-inspired Snuggie called the Wuggie. Rivers Cuomo had this to say about it: “A Wuggie is basically exactly like a Snuggie, except it says Weezer on it. The people at Snuggie are doing it with us and promoting it with us. It’s a totally legit Snuggie.” If you were worried about it not being “legit,” now you can rest easy. I’m pretty sure if anyone I know buys the Wuggie, I’ll have to pull the plug on our association. You’ve been warned.

Incoming: Later today – I’ll address the debacle that was The 2009 MTV Movie Awards.