February 15th, 2012

word

anomie [anuh-mee] n. Sociology. a state or condition of individuals or society characterized by a breakdown or absence of social norms and values, as in the case of uprooted people

birthday

Galileo Galilei (1564), Susan B. Anthony (1820), Harvey Korman (1927), Jane Seymour (1951), Matt Groening (1954), Chris Farley (1964), Conor Oberst (1980)

standpoint

I have nothing substantive to share today. I hope everyone had as great a Valentine’s Day as I did. You most likely deserved it. 🙂

And for my Facebook followers who are wondering why I took down my sardonic status update from last night, it’s because I’m trying to turn over a new leaf and be an accepting guy. But, christ, sometimes you people make it harder than it needs to be.

quotation

The language of friendship is not words but meanings. ↔ Henry David Thoreau

tune

So my nephew (and godson) is heavily into hip-hop. The other day I sent him the following video clip for “Electric Relaxation” by A Tribe Called Quest and asked him what he thought. His response was this: “Not a bad song and not a great one.” I just didn’t know how to properly respond. I guess he’ll eventually figure it out, right?

gallimaufry

Who out there was surprised by Oprah’s actions here? If you weren’t, you need to really explore why the hell you like Oprah so much.

→ See? You all thought I was nuts. For months I’ve been telling everyone who’d listen that Malachy the Pekingese was going to roll right over the competition at this year’s Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show. Now who’s laughing? (Before I get responses to this, I was being facetious. I had no idea who Malachy was before I read about him last night. It may seem weird to some of you that I have explain that but I can show you emails that would make your head spin. WordPress needs to develop a sense of humor filter.)

→ And just when you thought the Jerry Sandusky thing couldn’t get worse, here come this. Awfulness of the highest order.

Advertisements

02.15.11 – a tuesday

Add to DeliciousAdd to DiggAdd to FaceBookAdd to Google BookmarkAdd to RedditAdd to StumbleUponAdd to TechnoratiAdd to Twitter

word

inveigle [in-vey-guhl, –vee-] v. 1. to entice, lure or ensnare by flattery or artful talk or inducements (usually followed by into): to inveigle a person into playing bridge 2. to acquire, win or obtain by beguiling talk or methods (usually by from or away): to inveigle a theater pass from a person

birthday

Galileo Galilei (1564), Susan B. Anthony (1820), John Barrymore (1882), Cesar Romero (1907), Harvey Korman (1927), Melissa Manchester (1951), Jane Seymour (1951), Matt Groening (1954), Christopher McDonald (1955), Chris Farley (1964), Brandon Boyd (1976), Conor Oberst (1980)

standpoint

One of the millstones that accompanies maintaining a daily blog is the constant pressure to find something interesting to write about.

I’ve only recently returned to the euneJeune daily and, breathe easy, I’ve got lots on my mind and many thoughts to share with you folks.

But I want to try something different.

As readers, you all have always been great about giving me feedback regarding my content. Now, however, I’m looking for your feedback to shape the content. At least for the next week or so.

So, here’s how it’ll work. Email me at eunejeune@gmail.com. Tell me what you want me to write about. As long as it’s within reason, no subject will be dismissed. I’m not going to be picky about it but I’d prefer emails instead of blog comments.

All right, I’m excited about this. Looking forward to your suggestions.

quotation

I contend that we are both atheists. I just believe in one fewer god than you do. When you understand why you dismiss all the other possible gods, you will understand why I dismiss yours. ↔ Stephen Roberts

tune

Several months ago, I attended a quizzo in Conshohocken conducted by Mike, a good buddy of mine from college. (Check out his webpage here to see when and where he’s going to be next. His questions aren’t powder puff like some can be and, once you’re in the same room with Mike, you’ll think twice about picking up your smart phone to cheat.) In any case, there was a song-identification portion and he played “Long Time” by The Roots. I’d never heard it before and guessed wrong. (I did, however, take first place overall that night.) Afterwards, Mike told me what song it was and I listened to it about five times a day for the next two months. And I’m still not sick of it.

gallimaufry

Yesterday, pitchers and catchers reported to Clearwater FL for the very beginning of Phillies’ training camp. Roy Halladay, Cliff Lee, Cole Hamels, Roy Oswalt and Joe Blanton are, according to more than one expert’s opinion, the best starting rotation in the history of baseball. No pressure, fellas.

→ While I didn’t watch The Grammys (which my buddy Joe says makes me lame) I have been fascinated by the “enraged” Justin Bieber fans who were so upset the little guy was beat out by Esperanza Spalding in the Best New Artist category, they went online, defaced her Wikipedia page and politely asked the jazz musician to comply with simple requests such as, “GO DIE IN A HOLE.” Hey, classy kids, get used to the disappointment. I have a sneaking suspicion this won’t be your last taste.

→ If this Harold Camping character is correct with his prediction about the end of the world, and the rapture, starting on May 21st, I’m going to be pretty unhappy. May 22nd is my birthday. Can’t the universe just hold off for 24 hours so I can at least open my presents?

04.05.10 – A Monday

Add to DeliciousAdd to DiggAdd to FaceBookAdd to Google BookmarkAdd to MySpaceAdd to NewsvineAdd to RedditAdd to StumbleUponAdd to TechnoratiAdd to Twitter

word

casuistry [kazh-oo-uh-stree] n. 1. specious, deceptive, or oversubtle reasoning, esp. in questions of morality; fallacious or dishonest application of general principles; sophistry 2. the application of general ethical principles to particular cases of conscience or conduct

birthday

Thomas Hobbes (1588), Booker T. Washington (1856), Spencer Tracy (1900), Lord Buckley (1906), Bette Davis (1908), Gregory Peck (1916), Arthur Hailey (1920), Roger Corman (1926), Stanley Turrentine (1934), Colin Powell (1937), Michael Moriarty (1941), Max Gail (1943), Christopher “Kid” Reid (1964), Mike McCready (1966), Paula Cole (1968)

standpoint

My lady came from Paris yesterday so I spent last night hanging with her and that translates into no new standpoint today.

quotation

I think in a lot of ways unconditional love is a myth. My mom’s the only reason I know it’s a real thing. Conor Oberst

tune

Despite my indie rock tendencies, I’d be kicked out of every hipster dufus bar I had the misfortune of walking into if people knew I really don’t care for Conor Oberst, or Bright Eyes as he’s better known by. There is one song of his, however, that will always resonate with me. Here’s “I Must Belong Somewhere.”

gallimaufry

“It’s Butler vs. Duke for the National Title.” And I still don’t care.

→ Man, if only this was true. The saddest part of it is that it might actually do some good. Ugh.

Green Day? Soundgarden? Lady Gaga?!?! What the hell happened to you, Lollapalooza?

06.29.09 – Monday

Word: sociopath [soh-see-uh-path, soh-shee-] n. a person, as a psychopathic personality, whose behavior is antisocial and who lacks a sense of moral responsibility or social conscience

Birthday: William Mayo (1861), Nelson Eddy (1901), Slim Pickens (1919), Robert Evans (1930), Harmon Killebrew (1936), Gary Busey (1944), Richard Lewis (1947), Colin Hay (1953), Maria Conchita Alonso (1957), Michael Nutter (1957), Jeff Burton (1967), Sam Farrar (1978)

Quotation: To do a common thing, uncommonly well, brings success – Henry John Heinz

Tune: “Orchestrated indie pop with brilliant melodies and a quiet sense of everything.” That’s what Hybrid Magazine has to say about Portland, Oregon band Derby. It’s a damn near dead-on description, too. Check out “If Ever There’s A Reason” from Posters Fade. Here’s a year-old review of the album by Conor McKay of NPR.

Gallimaufry: In what is now becoming an almost daily occurence, another celebrity has suddenly passed away. Professional pitchman Billy Mays was discovered dead in his bed by his wife yesterday morning. Saturday afternoon, Mays, a man who was famous for yelling at the top of his lungs about the effectiveness of such products as OxiClean and Orange Glo,  bumped his head as his plane touched down in Tampa International Airport in what was described as “a rough landing.” As of yet, no one’s claiming a connection between the landing and Mays’ untimely death. I don’t care what anyone else has to say about it. The fact that the US Men’s National Soccer Team made it to the finals of the FIFA Confederates Cup and actually came close to beating Brazil before eventually falling 3-2 late in the game is a good thing. I’m proud of them. And you should be too. For 2010’s FIFA World Cup South Africa, this year’s showing in the Confederates Cup will give US soccers fans (all 254 of them) something to look forward to. Spoon has got to be the hardest working band in the history of music. I know it and now so do you. Unlike Conor Oberst, who releases something new each week (some good, most bad), Spoon keeps pumping out quality track after quality track. Tomorrow, the Merge Records band is releasing a new EP called Got Nuffin. Go get it on Amazon.